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Site For Sale

If anyone is interested in buying https://adam-driver.net (domain and content) please email me at colinmorganonline@gmail.com, male sites are just not for me, selling all for $60, can come with twitter account too! All of his movies are capped apart from 2!

Categories Articles White Noise

Adam Driver’s Netflix Movie “White Noise” Filmed In Cleveland Heights

Cleveland Heights, Ohio-If you think you’ve seen Adam Driver, Greta Gerwig, and Don Cheadle around the Severance Town Center lately, that doesn’t mean your eyes are fooling you.

The actors are in town shooting Netflix adaptations of the novel “White Noise” in a closed set of old Wal-Mart and other empty spaces in the Severance Circle. According to the city, the production crew assembles and shoots the set in an old large supermarket that closed in 2013. Filming of the film titled “Wheat Germ” began in early July in Wellington, Lorain County. Before moving to Oberlin and Cleveland Heights. Twitter account @AdamDriverFiles I recently found a movie crew in Canton.

Taken in northeastern Ohio. This is probably done in other cities, including Hiram. According to Portager, Expected to continue until autumn.

Source.

Categories Adam Site Updates

Official Opening

Welcome to Adam Driver Network, I am excited to finally launch the site (I have always wanted a site on him since Star Wars), I have been working so hard on it, there is still Girls screencaptures to add but wanted to get it open! I still have 2 movies not capped that I couldn’t find, so if anyone could find them I’d be forever grateful! We aim to bring the latest news, images and more, please consider donating as it will help our site show and please visit us again!

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Categories Annette Articles

‘Annette’ Is The Culmination of Everything Adam Driver’s Done Yet

In a recent Q&A at the Lincoln Center about his eccentric new rock musical Annette—in which a celebrity couple played by Adam Driver and Marion Cotillard become parents to a big-eared female marionette with an angelic singing voice—French director Leos Carax was asked about the unique malleability of his male lead. For the past four decades, Carax has been collaborating with his chameleonic countryman Denis Lavant, a spectacular shapeshifter who played nearly a dozen roles in 2012’s exuberant Holy Motors (including a sewer-dwelling mutant). Speaking with moderator Devika Girish of Film Comment, Carax perceived something kindred to Lavant in Driver’s highly physical acting style. “[They’re both] like monkeys,” the director said. “But I like monkeys. … When they don’t move, they look like statues; when they move, they look like dancers.”

The simian thing is key to Driver’s affect in Annette. His character, one Henry McHenry, is a kamikaze stand-up comedian whose controversial stage persona is the “Ape of God” (he even splatters a banana before going onstage). The question of how a misanthropic performance artist would sell out theaters across L.A. and dominate TMZ-style gossip shows while joking about blow jobs and gas chambers is one of several dozen mysteries that Carax’s wildly stylized film bulldozes over through sheer, delirious commitment to the bit. Working closely with the pop duo Sparks (who conceived the story and wrote the score), Carax piles on absurdist touches—secret trysts, supernatural curses, vengeful mermaids, a distinctly European version of a Super Bowl halftime show—until the whole enterprise threatens to buckle under its weight. Annette runs almost two and a half hours and feels longer; it doesn’t have Holy Motors’ fast-twitch momentum. But Driver carries this strange, ungainly allegory about art, fame, and love on his back and straight upward like the proverbial 800-pound gorilla. King Kong ain’t got shit on him.

Read more at the source.

Categories Annette Articles

‘Very Singular’: Adam Driver Sings Surreal Tune In ‘Annette’

Adam Driver has gone from “Star Wars” poster star to carving out a name for himself in magnificent roles where he can let his range as an actor speak for itself – and he’s taken on some stranger roles as well.

In Leos Carax’s “Annette,” an enchantingly demented rock opera, Driver sings in some very strange places. On a motorcycle. At sea. In the middle of lovemaking.

Since its premiere last month at the Cannes Film Festival, “Annette” has predictably caused a stir. As you might suspect, opinions tend to differ on absurdist-yet-sincere 140-minute musicals of elaborate melodrama scored by Sparks (the pop duo Ron and Russell Mael) and co-starring a glowing baby (the titular Annette) rendered in the form of a puppet.

And yet, if anyone can agree on anything in “Annette,” it’s that Driver is really good in it. Extraordinary, even. For an actor prone to launching himself fully into the visions of filmmakers, it’s maybe a new pinnacle of rigorous commitment.

In even the most out-there parts of “Annette,” Driver is ferociously dedicated and intensely physical. He goes all in. And those more unusual places for song, like in the middle of oral sex?

Another new experience.

“It feels very singular,” says Driver. “Like: I won’t be doing this again” – and then he chuckles – “most likely.”

Driver spoke in an interview on a hotel balcony overlooking the Mediterranean during his brief stay in Cannes. Immediately after sharing a cigarette with Carax during the standing ovation for “Annette” at its premiere, he flew out to return to shooting “White Noise” in Ohio with Noah Baumbach. His head, Driver said, was fully immersed in “White Noise.”

But “Annette” is something different for even the eclectic Driver. He signed on to it seven years ago after Carax, the French filmmaker of the blissfully bonkers “Holy Motors,” contacted him having only seen him in “Girls.”

Read more at the source.

Categories Annette Articles

Adam Driver On Singing, Surrealism And ‘Annette’

CANNES, France — In Leos Carax’s “Annette,” an enchantingly demented rock opera, Adam Driver sings in some very strange places. On a motorcycle. At sea. In the middle of lovemaking.

Since its premiere last month at the Cannes Film Festival, “Annette” has predictably caused a stir. As you might suspect, opinions tend to differ on absurdist-yet-sincere 140-minute musicals of elaborate melodrama scored by Sparks (the pop duo Ron and Russell Mael) and co-starring a glowing baby (the titular Annette) rendered in the form of a puppet.

And yet, if anyone can agree on anything in “Annette,” it’s that Driver is really good in it. Extraordinary, even. For an actor prone to launching himself fully into the visions of filmmakers, it’s maybe a new pinnacle of rigorous commitment. In even the most out-there parts of “Annette,” Driver is ferociously dedicated and intensely physical. He goes all in. And those more unusual places for song, like in the middle of oral sex? Another new experience.

“It feels very singular,” says Driver. “Like: I won’t be doing this again” — and then he chuckles — “most likely.”

Driver spoke in an interview on a hotel balcony overlooking the Mediterranean during his brief stay in Cannes. Immediately after sharing a cigarette with Carax during the standing ovation for “Annette” at its premiere, he flew out to return to shooting “White Noise” in Ohio with Noah Baumbach. His head, Driver said, was fully immersed in “White Noise.”

Read more at the source.

Categories Annette Articles

Annette Stars A Shirtless, Singing Adam Driver, But What Does It Mean?

The French filmmaker Leos Carax is the definition of all-in. His movies, which he’s been making since the 1980s, are careening vehicles for big, audacious performances, surreal visual spectacle, and sometimes jarring leaps of imagination. They’re also, almost always, engaged with the social issues of their time. In 1986, Mauvais Sang, a sci-fi parable starring Juliette Binoche, overtly referenced the AIDS crisis. 1991’s Les Amants du Pont Neuf paired Binoche with the one-of-a-kind French actor, mime, and acrobat Denis Lavant in an over-the-top melodrama about addiction, homelessness, and mutually destructive amour fou. And 2012’s Holy Motors—well, I’m not exactly sure what that one was about, but it followed Lavant’s enigmatic character through a single day of dizzying transformations, from hit man to motion-capture stunt performer to the father of a family of chimpanzees, and it was one of the best films of that year, a perceptual roller coaster that left the viewer’s brain abuzz with thrilling if hard-to-sort-out ideas about the ravages of capitalism and the instability of personal identity.

Nine years later we have Annette, a thoroughly banana cakes musical romance with story and songs by Ron and Russell Mael, the brothers who make up the veteran music duo Sparks (recently and delightfully showcased in a documentary by Edgar Wright). In the place of his longtime muse Lavant, Carax has cast an equally if very differently charismatic actor, this time a global movie star: Adam Driver, the hunky cad of Girls, the glowering space brat of the latest Star Wars trilogy, the volatile wall-punching ex-husband of Marriage Story. And in the place of the serenely luminous Binoche is the serenely luminous Marion Cotillard as Ann Desfranoux, a world-famous opera singer who holds audiences in thrall with ethereal vocal performances that inevitably end in her character’s onstage death.

Ann’s lover and eventually husband, played by Driver, is a superstar standup comedian named Henry McHenry, a shock-jock type who comes onstage in a ratty bathrobe and aggressively mocks his audience’s expectation that he make them laugh. In a none-too-subtle commentary on celebrity culture and the abjection of fandom, this approach makes them laugh uproariously. And in a variation I’ve never seen on the often-revisited genre of the fourth-wall-breaking musical, Henry’s audience occasionally bursts into song themselves, chiding the bad-boy comic for his unorthodox antics on and off the stage. When they’re performing, Henry kills and Ann dies, a metaphor that is again hammered home with a little too much force.

Read more at the source.

Categories Annette Articles

Annette: Adam Driver Singing In Sparks Musical Is Even Weirder Than It Sounds

Annette is a love story between comedy and tragedy. Which is not to say there is a partnership between these two creative impulses. How could there be when the outlook of director Leos Carax and rock band Sparks’ vision is so overwhelmingly tragic that it becomes their musical’s lone guiding star? And yet, seeing how one of those central tenets of performing art subsumes the other, and how Adam Driver’s evermore brooding presence can engulf even Marion Cotillard’s bubbliness, is hypnotic in its way.

As one of the buzziest films to come out of Cannes this year, Annette lives up to its singular hype: Yes, this is an honest to Sparks musical written by mercurial rock stars Ron and Russell Mael, and which features Driver and Cotillard singing during sex. But it’s the way the movie is aware of its inherent strangeness, particularly in moments like the sight of Kylo Ren and Talia al Ghul duetting mid-cunnilingus, that most clearly reveals its fixation with artifice. Indeed, Annette is a movie obsessed with the deceptions we accept, be it as an audience watching characters burst into song, or as lovers who ignore the flaws of our partners to our own peril.

Such is the tale of Henry McHenry (Driver) and Ann Defrasnoux (Marion Cotillard). Henry’s a stand-up comic who tells funny lies to make his audiences feel better. Ann is an opera star who performs hard truths about life and death to make her audiences cry. They’re both after the same thing: honesty, yet Henry goes about it through deception, and as a way to hide from the darkness within himself. Ann confronts it every night with comforting beauty, hence why when they meet up afterward, Henry says he “killed” his fans while Ann insists she “saved” hers.

Both lovers are weavers of illusions, so perhaps that’s why when they have a child, newborn daughter Annette literally appears to be a puppet made of cloth. No, really, in Henry and our eyes, she is a puppet, and one with a unique gift that walks the line between Henry and Ann’s talents.

It’s serendipitous that Annette is making its premiere on Amazon now, only a matter of weeks after Edgar Wright’s The Sparks Brothers documentary introduced the titular creative musical talent behind both films to a wider audience. As one of the most peculiar and beloved almost-famous bands of the last 50 years, Sparks are a tremendous musical force that were part of the British Invasion era of rock in the ‘60s and ‘70s (despite being from California) and who endured on to reimagine themselves as pioneers of ‘70s and ‘80s synth music, and then as composers in the ‘90s. With Annette, they try a new hat on as both the writers of the film’s story, as well as the songs which dominate most of the movie’s running time.

Read more at the source.